Feature

The ‘One of Us’ Manifesto

In the past few decades, Europe seems to have lost its moral compass. Numerous signs of hopelessness are apparent. It is less a matter of competing visions of Europe than of a deep moral crisis that threatens its survival as a civilisation. The question is whether this crisis is an opportunity for rebirth — or a sign that Europe is coming to an end.

Ireland Chooses Abortion

In January 2019, state-sponsored abortion services became available in Ireland. The Health (Regulation of Termination of Pregnancy) Act  2018 (the 2018 Act), provides that ‘termination of pregnancy’ is available on demand in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy.  … These changes to the law were made notwithstanding the duty of doctors in Ireland to practise ‘evidence-based’ medicine.

The Contribution of Roman Law to Modern Legal Systems

Roman law was the law of the city of Rome and subsequently of the Roman Empire. The influence of Roman law on modern legal systems has been immense: several legal systems of the world (including the civil law system of Europe) have been shaped significantly, directly or indirectly, by the concepts of Roman law.

Towards a ‘Hesperialist’ Future for Europe

The deep crisis in which Europe finds itself has not been imposed from outside. It comes from within. We are finally living the consequences of a danger that Robert Schuman, one of the EU’s ‘Founding Fathers’, warned about more than half a century ago — namely that a unified Europe must not merely remain an economic and technocratic enterprise: “It needs a soul, an awareness of its historical roots and its present and future obligations.”

The Crumbling of Western Culture

Cultural symbols matter — and what they now suggest is that the West is in retreat. This is a retreat in every aspect of life, from religion to popular culture.

Budapest Chronicle

The topic of immigration has become impossible to address rationally.  A mix of emotivism, historical guilt, a sense of  crippling fatalism, and the sanctimony and cultural hegemony of the Left has prevented us from discussing the topic calmly and rationally.  Anyone who tries is inevitably vilified as ‘racist’ and ‘xenophobic’. Consequently, the compulsory multicultural and pro-immigration thinking that has been imposed on us has led to some nonsensical and outright lies.

Libertarians & the Challenge of Immigration

Immigration is a pressing issue nowadays, especially in Europe and the United States. Regarding immigration, the standard position of economists…

The True, the Good & the Beautiful

Let me say a few things about art and truth first of all. The Enlightenment — by which I mean that mass of thinking and idea-mongering that began in the beginning of the 17th century and went on through the beginning of the 19th — was that period in our intellectual history that brought with it … a certain loss of the religious anchor in everyday life.

On Hungarian intellectuals

It was as a student that I met my first Hungarian intellectual. I was so ignorant at the time that I did not even know that Hungary had an intellectual tradition that in importance completely belied its relatively small size both in geography and population. Of course, knowledge is always finite and ignorance infinite, so perhaps I need not feel too ashamed of my former self; but my ignorance is still infinite.

The Present Battle

“At the moment, a battle is being fought between two models: that of a dehumanized world and that of a society — we should say, a civilization — that gives man his full place.”

These are the opening lines of a speech given by Msgr. Prince Louis de Bourbon, Duke of Anjou, at the recent World Congress of Families meeting in Verona.

Democratic Self-Government or Mass Migration?

If migration is ‘the biggest challenge of our time’ — the key issue is: who will decide this challenge? There are three possibilities: supranational institutions (let’s call this ‘Davos’); the migrants themselves arriving without the consent of the people in the nations that are affected; or the demos — the citizens of democratic nation-states.

Is Small Still Beautiful? A Swiss Perspective

From a Swiss perspective, small is beautiful. As important as recognizing this is, it is also worth considering the reasons behind this. There are three concepts rooted in economic anthropology that can help us understand this better: first, ‘scarcity and alertness’; second, ‘bonding and bridging’; and third, ‘competition’.