Debating the Future of the EU

Just as in a Roman arena where each ‘position’ was strongly and fiercely held, all vigorous debates require two opposing parties. But too often, in the midst of battle, the nuances of the debate — as well as some of the substance — are lost. Much the same has been true regarding debates over the origins (and merits) of the European Union.

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2019 Summer/Fall

Issue #16 is available now.

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The Problem with Cultural Marxism

‘Political correctness’ has always been a misnomer. The pushing of biology-defying gender ideology in schools, for example, is neither political nor correct; instead, this is the latest advance of a broader cultural movement to subvert conventional norms and values. Anyone who criticises such teaching as ‘PC’ confirms their status as ‘un-PC’, thus unwittingly giving credibility to the dominance of an ideology that trumps common sense. We argue that political correctness is a lame phrase that masks something far more sinister.

Italy after the Elections

Unlike previous European elections, Italian political parties in the elections of May this year focused squarely on the functioning of the European Union — rather than on the Italy’s internal or domestic politics. In fact, much of the debate was driven by the role that Italy could play in European affairs — particularly in reference to EU policies and the European economy.

Voegelin’s Plato (III)

Plato’s political efforts were animated by his more fundamental conviction that the health and salvation of the soul were man’s primary concern. He meant this in the existential sense: the soul must flee non-being, temporality, and disorder and become lovingly attuned to the ground of being, eternity, and order.